Matlock’s lone mechanic still geared up | News

MATLOCK—Bruce Stegemann has been investing his times in garages at any time considering the fact that he can don’t forget, escalating up in his minuscule municipality of Matlock.

“It was not like you was in a more substantial town wherever you could hop on your bike and go to the movies or uptown or no matter what. You was fundamentally stuck right here and experienced to discover your have entertainment,” Stegemann claimed. “That’s in all probability why I was a motorhead littlin’ and just began tinkering close to with engines due to the fact there was very little else to do.”

A lifelong Matlock citizen, Stegemann owns and operates Bruce’s Repair service. He specializes in small-motor tuneups as very well as servicing autos. His company is the only shop in town for possibly kind of get the job done.

Matlock has just 74 inhabitants, according to the 2020 U.S. Census. That statistic gives it the distinction as the smallest incorporated metropolis in Sioux County.

The 56-year-old Stegemann was around when the inhabitants was nonetheless in the triple digits.

“There was Friday nights and Saturday nights you could not find a parking place on the Key Avenue out below,” he stated.

Drivers can nevertheless obtain home at Bruce’s Fix.

Stegemann opened the store in 1993, just after ending up his mechanic’s education and learning just down the street in Sheldon. What would afterwards be identified as Northwest Iowa Group College was Northwest Iowa Specialized College again then. He labored at a pair diverse retailers in advance of settling into his own area in his own town.

Stegemann upgraded his smaller engine organization in 1999, introducing a substantial-ceiling garage geared up with a storage loft and loads of space to hold his instruments and tinkerings.







Bruce’s Repair service is parked at 588 Main St. in Matlock. It is the only shop for auto or modest motor maintenance in the small town in Sioux County’s northeast corner.



He can take pleasure in offering a services he reported each and every group needs, no subject its sizing.

“A ton of those little towns, they ain’t obtained substantially possibly,” Stegemann claimed. “It’s a single of these matters where by it’s just all dying out.”

For the most part, Stegemann runs Bruce’s Repair service by himself. He receives occasional aid from his son, Jason, who also is a mechanic. Both equally generations used their childhoods fascinated by the odor of oil and the sight of instruments that reign over any lived-in garage.

“My boy was the identical way like me expanding up,” the senior Stegemann explained. “As soon he bought 3 a long time old, he was out here in the store. He experienced to seize stuff and act like he was doing work on mowers by now.”

The work have improved a bit considering that Stegemann began getting his palms grimy. He reported it took a number of many years, but the “new, extravagant stuff” of the personal computer age has last but not least appear to dominate his devices.

“Even garden mowers are finding that way way too. They’re acquiring way a lot more sophisticated on some of them as opposed to what they utilised to be,” Stegemann claimed.

The exact principles nevertheless implement even though, the time-examined technician stated, and he has no problems about keeping in business enterprise.

Bruce’s Repair service receives a dependable inflow of customers in the hotter months as lawn mowers, weed trimmers and other products devise all kinds of methods to misbehave.

“It can be packed in right here. It’s challenging to get a automobile in below when in a when mainly because it’s so whole,” he stated.

Even in the slower wintertime months, there is generally a couple cars and trucks a 7 days in the garage.

No matter of the season, Stegemann often is the man to get in touch with in the sparse northeast corner of Sioux County. Some journey as extensive as a 50 %-hour to get to Bruce’s Repair service.

“We attempt to continue to keep all people going. I consider to satisfy everybody and continue to keep them going down the road or mowing the grass,” Stegemann said.







Bruce Stegemann, hands

Bruce Stegemann works with his hands in his garage in Matlock on March 8. He has run his possess shop, Bruce’s Repair, considering the fact that 1993.



He remembers when his father worked at Matlock’s generate sector when it was nevertheless open up. In addition to an put into action seller and a number of bars, the agrarian town also utilized to have typical livestock auctions.

“There utilised to be a hog-shopping for station in town, which is continue to below nevertheless, but it is closed. They really do not do practically nothing,” Stegemann stated. “Farmers made use of to convey their hogs in there and promote them until eventually they obtained these large confinements these days.”

The dwindling community nonetheless finds methods to stay alive.

The Matlock Fire Section has a crew of a dozen volunteers. Ag Companions however runs its grain elevator in city just about every harvest.

Even the mayor’s race heated up final 12 months as Charles Schwebach swung an electoral victory with a 25-16 vote margin.

Like Matlock, the re­­pair store and its hometown operator are not likely anywhere.

“I’ve lived right here all my lifestyle so it’s variety of difficult to leave now,” Stegemann stated.

Right after decades of doing the job with his arms, Stegemann reported he has noticed just about every little thing that can go erroneous with a car or truck. Some work simply call for replacing an complete auto engine and some are just changing a busted chain-observed part.

Final week’s venture was a rusted brake line.

“This will be entertaining,” he reported, peering into the wheel very well with a flashlight. “It’s fantastic to have a obstacle.”







Bruce Stegemann, garage

Bruce Stegemann gets to perform in his shop, Bruce’s Mend, in Matlock on March 8.